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How Much Water Is Inside Jupiter? NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Is About to Find Out
How Much Water Is Inside Jupiter? NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Is About to Find Out

NASA’s Juno spacecraft is just a few days shy of its arrival at the solar system’s biggest planet. The highly-anticipated mission, is about to take a peek into the real nature of Jupiter, hopefully providing new insights about the structure of this gaseous giant. Juno could be on the verge of redefining our current knowledge

China Conducts Surprise Launch of Its Second Shijian-16 Satellite
China Conducts Surprise Launch of Its Second Shijian-16 Satellite

Without any prior notice, China carried out on Wednesday, June 29, a secretive lift off of its Long March 4B booster carrying the Shijian-16 No.2 satellite. The rocket blasted off at exactly 11:21 a.m. local time (3:21 GMT), from the Launch Site 43 at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, located in China’s northwest Gansu Province.

Researchers Create New Method for Identifying Black Holes
Researchers Create New Method for Identifying Black Holes

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) professors have developed a faster, more accurate way to assess gravitational wave signals and infer the astronomical sources that made them. Their method directly compares data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) to cutting-edge numerical simulations of binary black holes, including simulations performed at RIT. In a paper available

Recent Hydrothermal Activity May Explain Ceres’ Brightest Area
Recent Hydrothermal Activity May Explain Ceres’ Brightest Area

The brightest area on Ceres, located in the mysterious Occator Crater, has the highest concentration of carbonate minerals ever seen outside Earth, according to a new study from scientists on NASA’s Dawn mission. The study, published online in the journal Nature, is one of two new papers about the makeup of Ceres. “This is the

What Did Earth’s Ancient Magnetic Field Look Like?
What Did Earth’s Ancient Magnetic Field Look Like?

                    New work from Carnegie’s Peter Driscoll suggests Earth’s ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. It is published in Geophysical Research Letters. Earth generates a strong magnetic field extending from the core